Connected Riding

Getting the Best Ride: Who's Responsible for What? Part II

There are three areas of focus that help us to get the "best ride", with our horses as well as in our life:
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Getting the Best Ride: Who's Responsible for What? Part I

It can be very confusing to understand what will be the best path to follow to help you achieve what you wish with your horse. Whether you are at the show chasing ribbons, on the trail doing geocaching or obstacles, or enjoying your horse on the ground, our time with our horses is OUR time together and it is precious.

Getting the Best Ride...Who is Responsible for What?

It can be very confusing to understand what will be the best path to follow to help you achieve what you wish with your horse. Whether you are at the show chasing ribbons, on the trail doing geo cashing or obstacles, or enjoying your horse on the ground, our time with our horses is OUR time together and it is precious.

Tools on the Trail: The Ability to Bend

 

This month, we will conclude our groundwork exercises that help us o

Tools on the Trail: Rotation in the Saddle

Last month, we talked about “transitions” and I shared the groundwork principle of Shoulder Press with you. This month, we’ll continue with the concept of transitions and introduce the concept of rotation in the saddle. The purpose of this article is to introduce you to rotation, while not sharing all aspects of the many ways to use and hence do, rotation!

Preparing for Better Transitions on the Ground - Shoulder Press

It continues to amaze me of the subtleties of some of the Connected Groundwork® exercises. The results can be profound when you support and bring attention to an area on a horse where the horse may have a holding or bracing pattern, or may just need some additional support. Shoulder press is one of these exercises, especially for a horse that tends to be stiff in the ribcage, and has tightness in his shoulders and the base of the neck.

Positive Results from the Ground Up

Do you ever call your horse lazy? Do you ever wonder if he knows where his feet are after he trips, stumbles, or even falls? Maybe he tends to drag his feet or it feels as though he doesn’t even attempt to lift a foot off the ground? When we are off balance, we are not able to keep ourselves upright and neither can your horse. Many horses are off balance and heavy on the forehand, which can contribute to the tripping, stumbling and dragging.

Don't Wait to Release Winter's Hold on Your Horse

Are you looking to come out of hibernation and start some earnest work with your horse? Would you like to create lightness (there’s more daylight hours!), suspension (a spring-like movement) and connection (less brace against the cold) for you and your horse? Learn more about “combing the lines” on the ground and in the saddle to unlock your horses potential and help remove the winter’s cold brace of standing against the elements.

Spooky vs Timid ~ What does your label do to your thinking?

We don’t always get the horse that we want, but we always get the horse that we need.  Your “spooky” horse may not be as spooky as you think.  Sure, he could have a tendency towards greater self preservation than other horses, however his body and your body (and your leadership with him) may add to his degree of spooky behavior.  If he’s more on the timid side, he may need more leadership and support from you in order to feel like he needs to be less reactive in certain situations.  And that leadership comes from your body language as well as your mental, physical and em

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